AWAKENINGS (1954-1956)

Monday, January 27, 2014

Individual acts of courage inspire black Southerners to fight for their rights: Mose Wright testifies against the white men who murdered young Emmett Till, and Rosa Parks refuses to give up her bus seat to a white man in Montgomery, Alabama.

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WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP AND RESOURCE CENTER AND CAMPUS ADVOCACY NETWORK

Friday, January 30, 2014,1:00 pm to 3:00pm

Join friends and staff of the WLRC/CAN as we celebrate the beginning of another semester!! Come learn more about our mission, goals, programs, services, and opportunities that we offer. This is a great time to meet like-minded individuals, students groups, or causes that aim to make a safe and inclusive campus for everyone.

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EYES ON THE PRIZE MOVIE SERIES: FIGHTING BACK (1957-1962)

Monday, February 3, 2014

States’ rights loyalists and federal authorities collide in the 1957 battle to integrate Little Rock’s Central High School, and again in James Meredith’s 1962 challenge to segregation at the University of Mississippi. Both times, a Southern governor squares off with a U.S. president, violence erupts — and integration is carried out.

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EYES ON THE PRIZE MOVIE SERIES: AIN’T SCARED OF YOUR JAILS (1960-1961)

Monday, February 10, 2014

Black college students take a leadership role in the civil rights movement as lunch counter sit-ins spread across the South. "Freedom Riders" also try to desegregate interstate buses, but they are brutally attacked as they travel.

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OPENING EXHIBITS: “STAINLESSNESS” AND “CHICAGOAXACA”

Join the UIC Social Justice Initiative for the opening reception of two concurrent printmaking exhibitions “Stainlessness” and “Chicagoaxaca” at Art In These Times (Art ITT), 2040 N. Milwaukee Ave. on February 12, 2014 from 6pm-8:30pm.

The exhibitions will be on view from January 17 – March 21, 2014.

Chicagoaxaca: Selections from The Assembly of Revolutionary curated by Ivan Arenas: In 2006, the repression of a teacher’s strike in Oaxaca, Mexico resulted in a grassroots social movement that held the city for six months.

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EYES ON THE PRIZE MOVIE SERIES: MISSISSIPPI: IS THIS AMERICA? (1963-1964)

Monday, February 24th, 2014

Mississippi’s grass-roots civil rights movement becomes an American concern when college students travel south to help register black voters and three activists are murdered. The Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party challenges the regular Mississippi delegation at the Democratic Convention in Atlantic City.

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GREAT CITIES, GREAT SCHOOLS: EDUCATION AND CIVIL RIGHTS IN THE 21ST CENTURY” PEDRO NOGUERA

Monday, March 3, 2014 6:30 p.m.

Dr. Pedro Noguera:Dr. Pedro Noguera is the Peter L. Agnew Professor of Education at New York University. Dr. Noguera is a sociologist whose scholarship and research focuses on the ways in which schools are influenced by social and economic conditions and the factors that obstruct and promote student achievement. He holds tenured faculty appointments in the departments of Teaching and Learning and Humanities and Social Sciences at the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education and Development at NYU. Dr. Noguera is also the executive director of the Metropolitan Center for Urban Education and co-director of the Institute for the Study of Globalization and Education in Metropolitan Settings (IGEMS). In 2008, he was appointed by the Governor of New York to serve on the State University of New York Board of Trustees.

Urban schools have been in a perpetual state of reform for more than thirty years, yet many schools in our major cities continue to struggle. Is something wrong with the approach we have taken? If so, what? WBEZ Reporter, Linda Lutton, will interview Professor Pedro Noguera on the lessons we should learn from these costly efforts and what might be a better direction for the future.

Linda Lutton: WBEZ education reporter Linda Lutton covers schools, education and issues affecting youth. Prior to joining WBEZ in 2008, Linda worked as a freelance reporter and radio producer in Michoacán, Mexico and previously as lead education reporter at the Daily Southtown. Linda’s reporting has appeared in the Chicago Reader, In These Times, Education Week, the Chicago Tribune, and others. She has contributed radio reports to This American Life, NPR’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, The World, and Marketplace.

This event is free and open to the public. To request disability accomodations, please contact Christiana Kinder, Great Cities Institute, (312) 996-8700.

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WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH PRESENTS:

STARVATION POLITICS Women, Race, and Gender in the ‘Discovery’ of Hunger in America

A lecture by Dr. Laurie Green, Associate Professor at the University of Texas, Austin

The ‘discovery’ of hunger by Robert F. Kennedy and other senators in the Mississippi Delta in 1967 set off a decade of turmoil about the very existence, the causes, and federal solutions to what a team of doctors termed starvation. The media then and historical accounts now focus on Kennedy’s role, obscuring the pressure preceding the visit by women prominent in the Black Freedom Movement such as Fannie Lou Hamer and Marian Wright [Edelman]. Professor Green’s lecture will challenge this representation of the struggle as one centered on white politicians, while also exploring the gendered and racialized politics that represented hunger as a Mississippi problem, even after independent investigators had identified similar crises among poor whites, Latinos and Native Americans.

Wednesday, March 5, 2014, 3:30pm-5:30pm

University of Illinois at Chicago, University Hall Room 950

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CHARLES OGLETREE, JR.

Wednesday March 12, 2014 @ 3:00p.m.

The UIC Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy Presents-The Annual Phillip J. Bowman Lecture, Part of the Chancellor’s Lecture and Event Series

“While lynching’s are a relic of the past, the racial discrimination that motivated them retains a stranglehold on today’s criminal justice system.”

About the Speaker: Charles Ogletree, Jr.

Charles J. Ogletree, Jr. is a prominent legal theorist who has earned an international reputation by taking a hard look at complex issues of law and by working to secure the rights guaranteed by the Constitution for everyone equally under the law. His most recent book is “The Presumption of Guilt: The Arrest of Henry Louis Gates, Jr. and Race, Class and Crime in America,” which draws on the 2009 mistaken arrest of Gates to explore issues of race and what must be done to create a more just legal system.

 

About the Phillip J. Bowman Lecture

This lecture has been established to honor Phillip J. Bowman’s contributions to UIC during his tenure as Director of IRRPP and Professor of African American Studies. It features national scholars of race, ethnicity, and public policy who provide timely analysis of issues that are critical to the field and to communities of color.

UIC Student Center East Room 302

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TEACHERS FOR SOCIAL JUSTICE

Maestra, a film by Catherine Murphy

Cuba 1961: 250,000 taught 700,000 people to read in one year.100,000 of teachers were under 18 years old. MAESTRA explores this story and the process.

Friday, March 14, 2014

Social Justice Initiative, Pop Up Just Art Gallery (PUJA), 729 W. Maxwell St.

6PM

Film provides subtitles. Film screening will be followed by discussion.

 

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